Monday, June 30, 2008

6月30日隨即的事情: Thus ends the part of my life you could call my life on the road . . .

*We said on Friday that we thought Scalia's reasoning on the interpretation of the Second Amendment was pretty flimsy.  The experts seem to agree that his reasoning with regards to the policy is sort of flimsy as well. From a WaPo op-ed titled Guns for Safety?  Dream on Scalia

In the real world, Scalia's scenario -- an armed assailant breaks into your home, and you shoot or scare away the bad guy with your handy handgun -- happens pretty infrequently. Statistically speaking, these rare success stories are dwarfed by tragedies. The reason is simple: A gun kept loaded and readily available for protection may also be reached by a curious child, an angry spouse or a depressed teen.

What's that thing called where you try to maximize the greatest amount of good for the greatest number of people again? 

*The NYT had a very interesting section on Sunday in which eight or so writers wrote short op-ed pieces on how the high price of petroleum (which we have discussed, ad-nasuem) will change society.  Frankly, we've always seen a sort of upside to the whole thing.  Fat Americans drive less and drive smarter, they start walking and riding bikes, stop thinking that 1 hour commutes each way are a good idea, and finally realize investing in alternative energy is a good idea.  Anyway, one column, titled "Goodbye to the Great American Road Trip," points out that the high gas prices may mean the end for the great American road trip.  The column thinks that's a good thing ("good riddance!" says the author), but we disagree.  The road trip is pretty much the most fun thing ever.   If you go with a significant other, it's a wonderful chance to for the most romantic of moments (we'll ask any exs that are reading this to refrain from comment...); if you go with a family member, it's a chance to bond (anybody ever see the Pete and Pete episode where the son has to think of things to talk about with his dad on the long car trip - awesome); and if you go by yourself it's a chance for some solemn reflection and self-analysis.  It's going gone, sure - but that don't mean we aren't going to miss it. The road trip may have been something quintessentially American, one of our guilty pleasures that came from being born white in the world's richest country as the oil addiction got worse and worse.  It might be a joy that our (collective, not editorial) children will never know, but we'll (editorial, not collective) always have some treasured memories.  I wonder if this means that mix-CDs - primarily made for road trips - are on the way out as well.  Time will tell. . .[Insert obligatory reference to Jack Kerouac's On the Road here]. . . 

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

yeah, i wonder what our kids will think when they see more or less penniless matt damon drive across the country at the end of 'good will hunting.' they'll probably wonder wtf was going on.

its me, i just dont feel like logging in.

Rule 12 (f) said...

haha that is a great point. le sigh.