Saturday, March 27, 2010

So People Hear Back from Journals On Monday . . .

Prepare yourself for a throng of people at the Scott Commons mailboxes. Some of you will be baller and maker two journals (and one of them will be VJIL). Others will make only one (VASE4LIFE), and some won't make any. We waxed lyrical on this phenomenon two years ago, but be nice. And remember, great things happen to those who don't make journals. SwampPoodle isn't on a journal, and she pwns us at everything; Justincredible isn't on a journal either, and has gone on to be a very successful madden-player and the current top-rated co-rec softball captain. So you see, journals aren't everything (and they are a lot of work on top that).

But we digress, for those of you who do make a journal, go to all of the receptions you get invited to. This isn't like a firm reception; you're not going to get retroactively dinged for not having too much beer or losing to me at shuffleboard.

Previously:
PSA About Journal Tryouts: Be Nice

50 comments:

Anonymous said...

HAHAHA. If you don't make a journal, don't take it personally. It's probably because the grading process is a FREAKING (UNHILARIOUS) JOKE.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone who tries on the editing part fail to make a journal?

Anonymous said...

4:06 -

Define "tries." If "tries" = "puts forth any effort at all," then yes, some people who try don't make a journal.

Anonymous said...

Mailboxes? The packet said that results were going to be posted outside the individual journal offices. Has the practice changed, or are the results also going to be in Scott Commons mailboxes?

Anonymous said...

Journals post at their offices, but also tend to write individual invitations and drop them off in mailboxes.

Anonymous said...

Are they usually in the boxes at 5 pm, earlier, or later?

Anonymous said...

Earlier. Good luck!

Anonymous said...

I always took grading the editing part seriously, but I agree there's probably a wide fluctuation in scores on the writing part. I usually gave high scores on the writing part if it sounded coherent. I'm sure others graded it much harder and some probably didn't even read it at all.

Anonymous said...

The editing component is pretty straight forward to grade. I think most journals have multiple people grade the editing component which should help limit the impact of wild swings in personal grading style.

Not sure if any secondary journals give much weight to the essay component, although I'm sure some do.

Anonymous said...

I don't know how other journals do it, but my journal made us grade from the answer key AND give/take away points for edits in addition to the key that were correct or incorrect. That effectively made us graders bluebook everything ourselves, and depending on the seriousness of the grader, introduces a TON of variation.

I think my managing board made a mistake in deviating from the key. I think if they wanted to deviate from the JLP key, they should have provide a "better" key themselves.

Anonymous said...

A better key than the JLP key? Does that mean one that's actually right? ZING!

But yes, lots of people last year tried at least somewhat seriously and failed to make a journal. I assume because journals were setting their # of invitations based on how many they accepted the past year (c/o '10) and failed to adjust to the huge number of c/o '11 people who tried out. This year, I heard tryout numbers went up to at least 335, so we'll see if they adjust this time.

I still don't understand why journals don't just accept everybody that applies. I don't think anybody outside of this school (and probably nobody inside it) will think any less of, say, VLBR because they had a 70-person editorial staff instead of a 30-person one. More people = less work, morons.

Anonymous said...

I assume the reason journals don't accept everybody is because some of the tryouts were horrible. If you can't come even close to correct Bluebooking style on the "important" tryout weekend, you're not going to be able to do it on your cite check, which then makes the journal itself look [shittier than it already looks].

Friend said...

A long time ago journal results were posted, at uncertain times, in the entrance hall of Clark Hall. I can still recall where I was when I heard they were up.

Anonymous said...

I agree with 2:29

After grading some of these tryouts, it was apparent that some people didn't consult the bluebook at all...no way in hell I want that person doing a cite check for me. It'll cause headaches for the managing board.

Anonymous said...

If you think everyone deserves to make a journal just because it's UVA, you obviously have never seen a tryout other than your own. 2:29 is right - poor Bluebooking undermines a journal's reputation and is a pain for all involved. It's not that hard to Bluebook correctly, and if someone couldn't put forth the effort for the tryout, everyone else is going to be picking up their slack from here on out.

Also, when I was trying out, one of my journals emailed invitations pretty early in the morning. The other, I had to go to the journal office when the list was posted to find out. Both put packets in my mailbox.

Definitely go to the receptions of whichever ones you make. The work will be the same on any journal you pick regardless of subject matter, but you can get a feel for the atmosphere of the journal members at the reception. The people can really make or break the experience.

Anonymous said...

Are certain secondary journals considered to be more prestigious? Aside from VJIL...

Anonymous said...

I was under the impression that Tax and VJIL are two of the more established ones

Anonymous said...

I was under the impression that Tax and VJIL are two of the more established ones.

Anonymous said...

do journals see the names of the people they rejected?

Anonymous said...

seppuku is the only honorable option for those who did not make a journal

Anonymous said...

In choosing between two journals, does it make sense to join a journal that relates to a field people actually practice, like Tax or Business, moreso than Social Policy or Politics? Do employers look at this?

Anonymous said...

VaSE e-mails went out about an hour ago.

Anonymous said...

There is one prestigious journal at UVa and the rest are just a journal. Distinguishing between the different secondary journals is hilarious trolling.

Anonymous said...

I doubt it matters which one you choose as far as prestige goes, but if you have a choice between two journals, I would take the one that will make the most sense to employers interviewing you and give you guys a topic of conversation during that interview. All they'll know about your journal experience is the name of the journal, so you might as well take that into account.

Anonymous said...

My bluebooking for VJIL is more prestigious than your bluebooking for Law & Business.

I consulted the W&L journal prestige rankings in formulating this argument. They are ironclad.

Anonymous said...

So glad I didn't do the tryout.

Anonymous said...

Anybody know the relative amount of work the journals give to 1Ls during the last few weeks of the semester?

Anonymous said...

If you don't make a journal, I would seriously complain, maybe ask to see your tryout. The grading procedure was just so ill-contrived, it made me sick as a grader.

Anonymous said...

Everyone I know made it on to multiple journals.

Anonymous said...

VLBR or Tax?

Anonymous said...

Social Policy seems to be the only one that actually rejected people.

Anonymous said...

VJOLT apparently accepted everyone who applied (69 people!).

Anonymous said...

Everyone I know who applied to VJIL got it.

Anonymous said...

you know smart people. vjil did reject people.

Anonymous said...

What % of people got both journals, one journal, or no journals?

Anonymous said...

does getting rejected from social policy = not in top 1/3 of tryouts for law review? i tried pretty hard on the tryout itself, but listed social policy as my second choice and didn't write a personal statement.

Anonymous said...

did Tax reject people?

Anonymous said...

Yes, I know people who didn't make tax.

Anonymous said...

I fucking hate these law assholes who demean others to build themselves up.

Anonymous said...

"I fucking hate these law assholes who demean others to build themselves up."

Then why the fuck did you come to law school?!

Anonymous said...

I don't really understand the anti-VJIL trolling. It wasn't the best/most rewarding experience of my life, but I liked that the journal was very well-run.

One warning for those considering signing up - the sources are largely treaty sources, EU documents, UN documents, etc. In order words, you'll be dealing with Rules 19 and 20 a lot more than standard law review articles and domestic cases.

Anonymous said...

"Then why the fuck did you come to law school?!"

So I could make $$$, why else? 3 years isn't that bad. I have a V50 offer so all these girls jerking each other off over VJIL don't bother me at all.

Peace.

Anonymous said...

So much neuroticism, snarkiness, and apathy all rolled into one: Why I love this blog and UVA Law in general.

Rule 12 (f) said...

Brother, I am going to take that as a compliment.

Anonymous said...

It definitely is. It was meant more about the comments the blog elicits than the blog itself. Love it either way, though.

Anonymous said...

I would love to know VJIL's job offer rate this year vs. other journals. I imagine it's not much different b/c, as they say, you can put lipstick on a pig but...

Anonymous said...

seppuku is the only honorable option for those who did not make VJIL

Anonymous said...

does getting rejected from social policy = not in top 1/3 of tryouts for law review? i tried pretty hard on the tryout itself, but listed social policy as my second choice and didn't write a personal statement.

Does not mean that at all. Law Review makes its primary cuts based on the writing component, while most other journals (including, probably, SP) focus on the editing part.

AND the writing component, especially, is quite subjective, so two journals might give the same essay wildly different scores (especially at secondary journals where they can't spend as much time/effort looking at them).

AND it's possible that given the huge number of applicants SP got this year, that they ended up looking at personal statements/rankings to see who was more serious about the journal and more likely to accept. After all, if you turn down half the people that apply, you want to make damn sure the other half actually plan to join.

So, no, this tells you next to nothing about Law Review. I really hope you make it now...

Anonymous said...

PSA: No one practices international law in real life

Anonymous said...

6:39 - I disagree: VJIL is not well-run. It's not any worse than the other journals, from what I hear, but they're not well-run either. When a journal knows which weeks you're going to have to do cite checks, or knows that it's going to make the editors grade tryouts right after spring break, the board should give a week or two's notice. What's the harm? I heard of people quitting their journals over the last-second "oh, BTW, you're grading tryouts now" that many of the journals pulled on their ed boards.