Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Daily Progress: "UVa Tuition Set to Surge"

An article in Saturday's Charlottesville Daily Progress suggests that the Board of Visitors is going to raise tuition rates across the board for both undergraduate and graduate students by as much as 10%.  No information in the article on how this would affect the (financially independent) Law School:
UVa’s Board of Visitors will meet this week to set the tuition rates for the 2010-11 academic year.
On the table will be a proposal to raise tuition and mandatory fees by 9.9 percent, or $956, to $10,628 for in-state undergraduate students. Tuition and fees for UVa students from outside Virginia would jump by 6 percent, or $1,902, to $33,574, according to board documents obtained late Friday.
Next year’s proposed in-state tuition and fee hike would be UVa’s most expensive in seven academic years.
....
Graduate students at UVa are facing tuition and fee increases that are fairly close to the undergraduate rates.
In-state graduate students would see their costs rise by $1,242, or 9.8 percent, next year. Out-of-state grad students would pay $1,238, or 5.5 percent, more.
Erin O’Hare, an out-of-state master’s degree student in UVa’s English department, said the university’s tuition is “insane.”
“I have a lot of loans. When I leave here [next spring] I’m going to owe $150,000,” she said. “It’s scary.”
Related:
UVa Tuition Set to Surge [Charlottesville Daily Progress]

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Approx. $11,000 annual tuition for an undergraduate degree as prestigious as UVA's is fucking steal. In state undergraduates have nothing to complain about.

Anonymous said...

These tuition hikes are crazy. You should be able to lock in at certain tuition level when you matriculate, or schools should be required to set the tuition rates four years ahead of time. Students need more certainty. If the prices get too high for me, I can't drop out and get 1/3 of a degree. Nor can I sell my 1/3 of an education on the market and use the proceeds to pay off my loans. It's pretty much extortion: "students, you either need to drop out and take a sunk cost, or you need to pay whatever we charge you." Does any other business operate like this?

Anonymous said...

whatever.

Anonymous said...

7:39 -- some states, including Illinois and Georgia have tried the "fixed for four" plan, with disastrous results. Schools just can't anticipate that far in advance, and frankly, students with any sense should anticipate that tuition will rise 5-10% a year. It sucks, but if you choose to go to a school with less than a full scholarship, that's the risk you take. (Not saying you shouldn't take that risk, BTW, just saying that it's not exactly a shock that tuition rises every year, everywhere...you're smart enough to get in college, shouldn't be surprised.)

Doubt this has any relevance to us and our fiscally-indepence budget,though -- I picture Paul Mahoney channeling Cartman to say "I do what I want!"

Anonymous said...

There is no good reason for anyone to take out 6 figures worth of student debt to get an English degree. What a joke. The worst part is that in 25 years we will all be paying the balance on this clown's unpaid debt.

Anonymous said...

uda clown mang!

Anonymous said...

10% is small change when you're paying 6 digits already